A neuroma, commonly called a pinched nerve, is a common condition caused by irritation of a nerve in the foot. Most commonly experienced between the ball of the 3rd and 4th toe (called a Morton's neuroma in this location), this condition is caused by irritation of the nerve due to motion of these bones. Over time this irritated nerve can produce scar tissue around the nerve that builds up and occupies more space.

As this scar tissue continues to build it will occupy more space and become more painful. Symptoms include shooting or electrical sensations or pins and needles sensation between the ball of the 3rd and 4th toe. Symptoms also include constant pain with walking and shoe wear most pronounced with wearing either tight-fitting shoes, shoes with a heel (causing more weight to be carried toward the front of the foot), or during activities such as pushing on a car's brake pedal. Treatment options include anti-inflammatory medication, accommodative padding to reduce the amount of pinching of the nerve between the head of the bones, steroid injections, which will often help relieve some of the irritation in the nerve and dissolve some of the scar tissue, and as a last resort, surgery. Surgery is done as an outpatient under IV sedation and involves surgical excision of this pinched nerve.

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